NTSB Calls for Nationwide Ban on Cell Phone Use While Driving

December 16, 2011, by Michael A. DeMayo

After spending a decade recommending that limits be placed on who can use a cell phone while operating a vehicle, now, the National Transportation Safety Board is now calling for a full ban on all cell phones and text messaging devices while driving. Only passengers would retain their right to talk on a phone or text message – unless it is an emergency situation, in which case a driver can call or text for help.

Currently, in North Carolina there is a statewide ban on texting while driving. Unlike a number of states, which have banned drivers from using hand-held cell phones, NC allows most drivers the use of both. The state has, however, prohibited drivers under 18 and school bus drivers from using cell phones. That said, even with such restrictions, this doesn’t mean that motorists are abiding by the laws. Our Charlotte, North Carolina personal injury law firm are aware of the impact that distracted driving can have on a motorist’s ability to drive safely. We represent victims and their families who suffered injury or experienced a death because a driver or another party was negligent and caused a North Carolina car accident.

Unfortunately, even though there is growing awareness of the dangers of texting and other distracted driving behaviors, many people can’t seem to stop. Last week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued its findings based on a national survey it conducted. Over 6,000 drivers participated.

Per the survey:

  • At any moment in 2010, nearly 1 out of every 100 drivers was either emailing, texting, on the Internet, or using a hand-held device for other purposes while rating. This rate of activity is about 50% over from the year before.
  • Most surveyed said they wouldn’t hesitate to answer an incoming call while driving.
  • Almost 2 out of 10 drivers admitted to sending emails or texting while driving.
  • Drivers in the 21-24 age group were more likely to text and drive.
  • Over half of respondents said making a call while driving doesn’t impact the way they drive.
  • About a quarter of those surveyed had the same opinion regarding how texting or sending emails affected their driving abilities.
  • 90% said they don’t like it when they are riding in car operated by a driver that is texting.
  • Bad weather was the situation during which most respondents would hesitate to talk on a cell phone or text/e-mail while driving.
  • Bumper-to-bumper traffic and rapidly moving traffic were two situations that might compel some driver to stop texting/e-mailing/talking on the phone.

Driver electronic device use in 2010, NHTSA, December 2011 (PDF)

NTSB: Ban all driver use of cell phones, CBS, December 13, 2011

More drivers texting but few think it’s dangerous, survey says, Denver Post/AP, December 9, 2011


More Blog Posts:

Enter Our Charlotte, North Carolina Personal Injury Law Firm’s Drunk Driving Awareness Campaign This Holiday Season and Give Yourself the Chance to Win a Flip Camera, North Carolina Injury Lawyer Blog, December 12, 2011

North Carolina Personal Injury: The Dangers of Road Rage, North Carolina Injury Lawyer Blog, December

 
 

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '}' in /home/ncarinju/public_html/wp-content/themes/demayo_blogs/footer.php on line 107